PARTNERS

As a company, LDI takes pride in we create and how that partnership really gives an edge in the work we do together. Being a partner means that we take as much our clients does when it comes to success. We spend a great deal of time studying the clients/ their industry on where we give the best results possible and use the most effective coaching approach that shortens the time to self-sustainment. On the first day of our engagement we start the exit strategy, we train-coach-mentor to ensure that we leave behind a strong organization and skilled people. 

World map with our  offices

HEAD OFFICE

Team Americas

10 Senior Practitioners

EUROPEAN OFFICE

Team Europe/Asia

10 Senior Practitioners

World map with our  offices 

HEAD OFFICE

Atlanta , GA

Team Americas

10 Senior Practitioners

EUROPEAN OFFICE

Bristol,UK

Team Europe/Asia

10 Senior Practitioners

TESTEMONIAL

The model included homework exercises where we had to use the tools. They really cemented the learning.

Operator

The new tools presented, fit perfectly with the real-time roadblocks we find when installing WCM.

Maintenance Leader

It was perfect having all levels in the organization represented in the same classroom

Technology leader

I’m very impressed with how the Leading WCM training has improved our teaming skills. We were good before and now we are approaching great

BU Manager

The way LDI engage the people in our organization is outstanding. We have worked with many consultancies but never one that brings so much value in such an inspiring way.

Plant Manager

To work with consultants who have a real experience is amazing. I know I’m learning in every engagement.

Process Engineer

TESTEMONIAL

The model included homework exercises where we had to use the tools. They really cemented the learning.

Operator

The new tools presented, fit perfectly with the real-time roadblocks we find when installing WCM.

Maintenance Leader

It was perfect having all levels in the organization represented in the same classroom

Technology leader

I’m very impressed with how the Leading WCM training has improved our teaming skills. We were good before and now we are approaching great

BU Manager

The way LDI engage the people in our organization is outstanding. We have worked with many consultancies but never one that brings so much value in such an inspiring way.

Plant Manager

To work with consultants who have a real experience is amazing. I know I’m learning in every engagement.

Process Engineer

CASE STUDY

  • Industry sector:

    A $20 billion agribusiness company has a plant that produces dried spices and vegetables for industrial and food service applications. Different grades of finished products formats from sliced, chopped, grated, flaked or powdered forms are packed into 55-gallon fiber drums or multiwalled corrugated totes.

 

  • Problem:

    Throughput on drier #3 has slowly reduced from 12,500 lbs. / hr. to 11,000 lbs. / hr. over a period of 3 yrs. thus increasing the number of days the dryer must be in operation to complete the annual harvest that lasts approx. 5 months. This results in increased labor and utilities usage. This facility runs 24/7 during the harvest season. Additional annual costs due to reduced throughput are estimated at $130,000.00 (labor and utilities).  Several ad hoc changes to the drier have been made over the past 3 years with no positive impact. Drier dimensions are approx.15ft Wide X 20ft. High X 300ft. Long.

 

  • Goal:

    Using a 2 1/2 day on-site session, facilitate a team of operators, mechanics, engineers and supervisors to utilize proven problem-solving tools, techniques and processes to identify issues negatively impacting drier throughput and identify priority improvements necessary to restore drier throughput back to 12,500 lbs. / hr. in time for next pack season (starting in 3 months).

 

  • Criteria:

    During 2 ½ day workshop, train plant team on the proper use of Brain Storming, 4 M analysis, Fishbone diagram, Principles of Operation, 2W-2H, Why-Why analysis, effective countermeasures, team building and action plans to gain approval from plant management to move forward and complete the recommended actions plans prior to start of the pack season.

 

  • How:

    The team was first tasked with explaining the principles of operation of the drier unit which has 6 drying stations and reduces moisture from 23% to a target of <4%. Then the team took a GEMBA walk to validate function and current condition of equipment. Back in the conference room, a scatter diagram of issues using Post-It notes was created and grouped into 4M Fishbone diagram. The top 5 issues in frequency were run through the Why-Why analysis to identify root causes. Sub-teams were assigned to identify and recommend corrective action for their assigned issue. Team discussions were facilitated by me. A complete list of key issues/countermeasures was generated and an action plan to close was agreed upon by the team and presented to plant management for buy-in.

 

  • Results:

    Upon completion of 85% of actions, drier #3 started the pack season at 12,000 lbs. / hr. throughput. Many of the actions were adjustments and restoration in nature. Within another month, baffles in the exhaust system were modified due to being hard to access and throughput was increased back to the original 12,500 lbs. / hr. All changes were documented, visual controls added to the equipment, a maintenance plan developed, and key operators were trained on proper setup and operation.

CASE STUDY

  • Industry sector:

    A $20 billion agribusiness company has a plant that produces dried spices and vegetables for industrial and food service applications. Different grades of finished products formats from sliced, chopped, grated, flaked or powdered forms are packed into 55-gallon fiber drums or multiwalled corrugated totes.

 

  • Problem:

    Throughput on drier #3 has slowly reduced from 12,500 lbs. / hr. to 11,000 lbs. / hr. over a period of 3 yrs. thus increasing the number of days the dryer must be in operation to complete the annual harvest that lasts approx. 5 months. This results in increased labor and utilities usage. This facility runs 24/7 during the harvest season. Additional annual costs due to reduced throughput are estimated at $130,000.00 (labor and utilities).  Several ad hoc changes to the drier have been made over the past 3 years with no positive impact. Drier dimensions are approx.15ft Wide X 20ft. High X 300ft. Long.

 

  • Goal:

    Using a 2 1/2 day on-site session, facilitate a team of operators, mechanics, engineers and supervisors to utilize proven problem-solving tools, techniques and processes to identify issues negatively impacting drier throughput and identify priority improvements necessary to restore drier throughput back to 12,500 lbs. / hr. in time for next pack season (starting in 3 months).

 

  • Criteria:

    During 2 ½ day workshop, train plant team on the proper use of Brain Storming, 4 M analysis, Fishbone diagram, Principles of Operation, 2W-2H, Why-Why analysis, effective countermeasures, team building and action plans to gain approval from plant management to move forward and complete the recommended actions plans prior to start of the pack season.

 

  • How:

    The team was first tasked with explaining the principles of operation of the drier unit which has 6 drying stations and reduces moisture from 23% to a target of <4%. Then the team took a GEMBA walk to validate function and current condition of equipment. Back in the conference room, a scatter diagram of issues using Post-It notes was created and grouped into 4M Fishbone diagram. The top 5 issues in frequency were run through the Why-Why analysis to identify root causes. Sub-teams were assigned to identify and recommend corrective action for their assigned issue. Team discussions were facilitated by me. A complete list of key issues/countermeasures was generated and an action plan to close was agreed upon by the team and presented to plant management for buy-in.

 

  • Results:

    Upon completion of 85% of actions, drier #3 started the pack season at 12,000 lbs. / hr. throughput. Many of the actions were adjustments and restoration in nature. Within another month, baffles in the exhaust system were modified due to being hard to access and throughput was increased back to the original 12,500 lbs. / hr. All changes were documented, visual controls added to the equipment, a maintenance plan developed, and key operators were trained on proper setup and operation.